Install OEM USB Drivers. Dev драйвер


Install OEM USB Drivers  |  Android Developers

If you are developing on Windows and want to connect a device for testing, then you need to install the appropriate USB driver. This page provides links to the web sites for several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), where you can download the appropriate USB driver for your device.

If you're developing on Mac OS X or Linux, then you shouldn't need a USB driver. Instead read Using Hardware Devices.

To connect and debug with any of the Google Nexus devices using Windows, you need to install the Google USB driver.

Install a USB driver

First, find the appropriate driver for your device from the OEM drivers table below.

Once you've downloaded your USB driver, follow the instructions below to install or upgrade the driver, based on your version of Windows and whether you're installing for the first time or upgrading an existing driver. Then see Using Hardware Devices for other important information about using an Android device for development.

Caution: You may make changes to android_winusb.inf file found inside usb_driver\ (for example, to add support for other devices), however, this will lead to security warnings when you install or upgrade the driver. Making any other changes to the driver files may break the installation process.

Windows 10

To install the Android USB driver on Windows 10 for the first time, do the following:

  1. Connect your Android device to your computer's USB port.
  2. From Windows Explorer, open Computer Management.
  3. In the Computer Management left pane, select Device Manager.
  4. In the Device Manager right pane, locate and expand Portable Devices or Other Devices, depending on which one you see.
  5. Right-click the name of the device you connected, and then select Update Driver Software.
  6. In the Hardware Update wizard, select Browse my computer for driver software and click Next.
  7. Click Browse and then locate the USB driver folder. For example, the Google USB Driver is located in android_sdk\extras\google\usb_driver\.
  8. Click Next to install the driver.

Windows 8.1

To install the Android USB driver on Windows 8.1 for the first time, do the following:

  1. Connect your Android device to your computer's USB port.
  2. Access search, as follows:

    Touch screen: On your computer, swipe in from the right edge of the screen and tap Search.

    Using a mouse: Point to the lower-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer up, and then click Search.

  3. In the search box, type into and then click Device Manager.
  4. Double-click the device category, and then double-click the device you want.
  5. Click the Driver tab, click Update Driver, and follow the instructions.

Windows 7

To install the Android USB driver on Windows 7 for the first time, do the following:

  1. Connect your Android device to your computer's USB port.
  2. Right-click on Computer from your desktop or Windows Explorer, and select Manage.
  3. Select Devices in the left pane.
  4. Locate and expand Other device in the right pane.
  5. Right-click the device name (such as Nexus S) and select Update Driver Software. This will launch the Hardware Update Wizard.
  6. Select Browse my computer for driver software and click Next.
  7. Click Browse and locate the USB driver folder. (The Google USB Driver is located in android_sdk\extras\google\usb_driver\.)
  8. Click Next to install the driver.

Or, to upgrade an existing Android USB driver on Windows 7 and higher with the new driver:

  1. Connect your Android device to your computer's USB port.
  2. Right-click on Computer from your desktop or Windows Explorer, and select Manage.
  3. Select Device Manager in the left pane of the Computer Management window.
  4. Locate and expand Android Phone in the right pane.
  5. Right-click on Android Composite ADB Interface and select Update Driver. This will launch the Hardware Update Wizard.
  6. Select Install from a list or specific location and click Next.
  7. Select Search for the best driver in these locations; uncheck Search removable media; and check Include this location in the search.
  8. Click Browse and locate the USB driver folder. (The Google USB Driver is located in android_sdk\extras\google\usb_driver\.)
  9. Click Next to upgrade the driver.

Get OEM drivers

If you don't see a link for the manufacturer of your device here, go to the support section of the manufacturer's website and search for USB driver downloads for your device.

developer.android.com

Device driver - Wikipedia

In computing, a device driver is a computer program that operates or controls a particular type of device that is attached to a computer.[1] A driver provides a software interface to hardware devices, enabling operating systems and other computer programs to access hardware functions without needing to know precise details about the hardware being used.

A driver communicates with the device through the computer bus or communications subsystem to which the hardware connects. When a calling program invokes a routine in the driver, the driver issues commands to the device. Once the device sends data back to the driver, the driver may invoke routines in the original calling program. Drivers are hardware dependent and operating-system-specific. They usually provide the interrupt handling required for any necessary asynchronous time-dependent hardware interface.[2]

Purpose[edit]

The main purpose of device drivers is to provide abstraction by acting as a translator between a hardware device and the applications or operating systems that use it.[1] Programmers can write the higher-level application code independently of whatever specific hardware the end-user is using.

For example, a high-level application for interacting with a serial port may simply have two functions for "send data" and "receive data". At a lower level, a device driver implementing these functions would communicate to the particular serial port controller installed on a user's computer. The commands needed to control a 16550 UART are much different from the commands needed to control an FTDI serial port converter, but each hardware-specific device driver abstracts these details into the same (or similar) software interface.

Development[edit]

Writing a device driver requires an in-depth understanding of how the hardware and the software works for a given platform function. Because drivers require low-level access to hardware functions in order to operate, drivers typically operate in a highly privileged environment and can cause system operational issues if something goes wrong. In contrast, most user-level software on modern operating systems can be stopped without greatly affecting the rest of the system. Even drivers executing in user mode can crash a system if the device is erroneously programmed. These factors make it more difficult and dangerous to diagnose problems.[3]

The task of writing drivers thus usually falls to software engineers or computer engineers who work for hardware-development companies. This is because they have better information than most outsiders about the design of their hardware. Moreover, it was traditionally considered in the hardware manufacturer's interest to guarantee that their clients can use their hardware in an optimum way. Typically, the Logical Device Driver (LDD) is written by the operating system vendor, while the Physical Device Driver (PDD) is implemented by the device vendor. But in recent years non-vendors have written numerous device drivers, mainly for use with free and open source operating systems. In such cases, it is important that the hardware manufacturer provides information on how the device communicates. Although this information can instead be learned by reverse engineering, this is much more difficult with hardware than it is with software.

Microsoft has attempted to reduce system instability due to poorly written device drivers by creating a new framework for driver development, called Windows Driver Foundation (WDF). This includes User-Mode Driver Framework (UMDF) that encourages development of certain types of drivers—primarily those that implement a message-based protocol for communicating with their devices—as user-mode drivers. If such drivers malfunction, they do not cause system instability. The Kernel-Mode Driver Framework (KMDF) model continues to allow development of kernel-mode device drivers, but attempts to provide standard implementations of functions that are known to cause problems, including cancellation of I/O operations, power management, and plug and play device support.

Apple has an open-source framework for developing drivers on macOS called the I/O Kit.

In Linux environments, programmers can build device drivers as parts of the kernel, separately as loadable modules, or as user-mode drivers (for certain types of devices where kernel interfaces exist, such as for USB devices). Makedev includes a list of the devices in Linux: ttyS (terminal), lp (parallel port), hd (disk), loop, sound (these include mixer, sequencer, dsp, and audio)...[4]

The Microsoft Windows .sys files and Linux .ko modules contain loadable device drivers. The advantage of loadable device drivers is that they can be loaded only when necessary and then unloaded, thus saving kernel memory.

Kernel mode vs. user mode[edit]

Device drivers, particularly on modern[update]Microsoft Windows platforms, can run in kernel-mode (Ring 0 on x86 CPUs) or in user-mode (Ring 3 on x86 CPUs).[5] The primary benefit of running a driver in user mode is improved stability, since a poorly written user mode device driver cannot crash the system by overwriting kernel memory.[6] On the other hand, user/kernel-mode transitions usually impose a considerable performance overhead, thereby prohibiting user-mode drivers for low latency and high throughput requirements.

Kernel space can be accessed by user module only through the use of system calls. End user programs like the UNIX shell or other GUI-based applications are part of the user space. These applications interact with hardware through kernel supported functions.

Applications[edit]

Because of the diversity of modern[update] hardware and operating systems, drivers operate in many different environments.[7] Drivers may interface with:

Common levels of abstraction for device drivers include:

  • For hardware:
    • Interfacing directly
    • Writing to or reading from a device control register
    • Using some higher-level interface (e.g. Video BIOS)
    • Using another lower-level device driver (e.g. file system drivers using disk drivers)
    • Simulating work with hardware, while doing something entirely different[8]
  • For software:
    • Allowing the operating system direct access to hardware resources
    • Implementing only primitives
    • Implementing an interface for non-driver software (e.g. TWAIN)
    • Implementing a language, sometimes quite high-level (e.g. PostScript)

So choosing and installing the correct device drivers for given hardware is often a key component of computer system configuration.[9]

Virtual device drivers[edit]

Virtual device drivers represent a particular variant of device drivers. They are used to emulate a hardware device, particularly in virtualization environments, for example when a DOS program is run on a Microsoft Windows computer or when a guest operating system is run on, for example, a Xen host. Instead of enabling the guest operating system to dialog with hardware, virtual device drivers take the opposite role and emulates a piece of hardware, so that the guest operating system and its drivers running inside a virtual machine can have the illusion of accessing real hardware. Attempts by the guest operating system to access the hardware are routed to the virtual device driver in the host operating system as e.g., function calls. The virtual device driver can also send simulated processor-level events like interrupts into the virtual machine.

Virtual devices may also operate in a non-virtualized environment. For example, a virtual network adapter is used with a virtual private network, while a virtual disk device is used with iSCSI. A good example for virtual device drivers can be Daemon Tools.

There are several variants of virtual device drivers, such as VxDs, VLMs, and VDDs.

Open drivers[edit]

Solaris descriptions of commonly used device drivers:

  • fas: Fast/wide SCSI controller
  • hme: Fast (10/100 Mbit/s) Ethernet
  • isp: Differential SCSI controllers and the SunSwift card
  • glm: (Gigabaud Link Module[12]) UltraSCSI controllers
  • scsi: Small Computer Serial Interface (SCSI) devices
  • sf: soc+ or social Fiber Channel Arbitrated Loop (FCAL)
  • soc: SPARC Storage Array (SSA) controllers and the control device
  • social: Serial optical controllers for FCAL (soc+)

Identifiers[edit]

A device on the PCI bus or USB is identified by two IDs which consist of 4 hexadecimal numbers each. The vendor ID identifies the vendor of the device. The device ID identifies a specific device from that manufacturer/vendor.

A PCI device has often an ID pair for the main chip of the device, and also a subsystem ID pair which identifies the vendor, which may be different from the chip manufacturer.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

en.wikipedia.org

Get the Google USB Driver  |  Android Developers

Download the Google USB driver

Before downloading, you must agree to the following terms and conditions.

Terms and Conditions

This is the Android Software Development Kit License Agreement

1. Introduction

1.1 The Android Software Development Kit (referred to in the License Agreement as the "SDK" and specifically including the Android system files, packaged APIs, and Google APIs add-ons) is licensed to you subject to the terms of the License Agreement. The License Agreement forms a legally binding contract between you and Google in relation to your use of the SDK. 1.2 "Android" means the Android software stack for devices, as made available under the Android Open Source Project, which is located at the following URL: http://source.android.com/, as updated from time to time. 1.3 A "compatible implementation" means any Android device that (i) complies with the Android Compatibility Definition document, which can be found at the Android compatibility website (http://source.android.com/compatibility) and which may be updated from time to time; and (ii) successfully passes the Android Compatibility Test Suite (CTS). 1.4 "Google" means Google LLC, a Delaware corporation with principal place of business at 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States.

2. Accepting this License Agreement

2.1 In order to use the SDK, you must first agree to the License Agreement. You may not use the SDK if you do not accept the License Agreement. 2.2 By clicking to accept, you hereby agree to the terms of the License Agreement. 2.3 You may not use the SDK and may not accept the License Agreement if you are a person barred from receiving the SDK under the laws of the United States or other countries, including the country in which you are resident or from which you use the SDK. 2.4 If you are agreeing to be bound by the License Agreement on behalf of your employer or other entity, you represent and warrant that you have full legal authority to bind your employer or such entity to the License Agreement. If you do not have the requisite authority, you may not accept the License Agreement or use the SDK on behalf of your employer or other entity.

3. SDK License from Google

3.1 Subject to the terms of the License Agreement, Google grants you a limited, worldwide, royalty-free, non-assignable, non-exclusive, and non-sublicensable license to use the SDK solely to develop applications for compatible implementations of Android. 3.2 You may not use this SDK to develop applications for other platforms (including non-compatible implementations of Android) or to develop another SDK. You are of course free to develop applications for other platforms, including non-compatible implementations of Android, provided that this SDK is not used for that purpose. 3.3 You agree that Google or third parties own all legal right, title and interest in and to the SDK, including any Intellectual Property Rights that subsist in the SDK. "Intellectual Property Rights" means any and all rights under patent law, copyright law, trade secret law, trademark law, and any and all other proprietary rights. Google reserves all rights not expressly granted to you. 3.4 You may not use the SDK for any purpose not expressly permitted by the License Agreement. Except to the extent required by applicable third party licenses, you may not copy (except for backup purposes), modify, adapt, redistribute, decompile, reverse engineer, disassemble, or create derivative works of the SDK or any part of the SDK. 3.5 Use, reproduction and distribution of components of the SDK licensed under an open source software license are governed solely by the terms of that open source software license and not the License Agreement. 3.6 You agree that the form and nature of the SDK that Google provides may change without prior notice to you and that future versions of the SDK may be incompatible with applications developed on previous versions of the SDK. You agree that Google may stop (permanently or temporarily) providing the SDK (or any features within the SDK) to you or to users generally at Google's sole discretion, without prior notice to you. 3.7 Nothing in the License Agreement gives you a right to use any of Google's trade names, trademarks, service marks, logos, domain names, or other distinctive brand features. 3.8 You agree that you will not remove, obscure, or alter any proprietary rights notices (including copyright and trademark notices) that may be affixed to or contained within the SDK.

4. Use of the SDK by You

4.1 Google agrees that it obtains no right, title or interest from you (or your licensors) under the License Agreement in or to any software applications that you develop using the SDK, including any intellectual property rights that subsist in those applications. 4.2 You agree to use the SDK and write applications only for purposes that are permitted by (a) the License Agreement and (b) any applicable law, regulation or generally accepted practices or guidelines in the relevant jurisdictions (including any laws regarding the export of data or software to and from the United States or other relevant countries). 4.3 You agree that if you use the SDK to develop applications for general public users, you will protect the privacy and legal rights of those users. If the users provide you with user names, passwords, or other login information or personal information, you must make the users aware that the information will be available to your application, and you must provide legally adequate privacy notice and protection for those users. If your application stores personal or sensitive information provided by users, it must do so securely. If the user provides your application with Google Account information, your application may only use that information to access the user's Google Account when, and for the limited purposes for which, the user has given you permission to do so. 4.4 You agree that you will not engage in any activity with the SDK, including the development or distribution of an application, that interferes with, disrupts, damages, or accesses in an unauthorized manner the servers, networks, or other properties or services of any third party including, but not limited to, Google or any mobile communications carrier. 4.5 You agree that you are solely responsible for (and that Google has no responsibility to you or to any third party for) any data, content, or resources that you create, transmit or display through Android and/or applications for Android, and for the consequences of your actions (including any loss or damage which Google may suffer) by doing so. 4.6 You agree that you are solely responsible for (and that Google has no responsibility to you or to any third party for) any breach of your obligations under the License Agreement, any applicable third party contract or Terms of Service, or any applicable law or regulation, and for the consequences (including any loss or damage which Google or any third party may suffer) of any such breach.

5. Your Developer Credentials

5.1 You agree that you are responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of any developer credentials that may be issued to you by Google or which you may choose yourself and that you will be solely responsible for all applications that are developed under your developer credentials.

6. Privacy and Information

6.1 In order to continually innovate and improve the SDK, Google may collect certain usage statistics from the software including but not limited to a unique identifier, associated IP address, version number of the software, and information on which tools and/or services in the SDK are being used and how they are being used. Before any of this information is collected, the SDK will notify you and seek your consent. If you withhold consent, the information will not be collected. 6.2 The data collected is examined in the aggregate to improve the SDK and is maintained in accordance with Google's Privacy Policy.

7. Third Party Applications

7.1 If you use the SDK to run applications developed by a third party or that access data, content or resources provided by a third party, you agree that Google is not responsible for those applications, data, content, or resources. You understand that all data, content or resources which you may access through such third party applications are the sole responsibility of the person from which they originated and that Google is not liable for any loss or damage that you may experience as a result of the use or access of any of those third party applications, data, content, or resources. 7.2 You should be aware the data, content, and resources presented to you through such a third party application may be protected by intellectual property rights which are owned by the providers (or by other persons or companies on their behalf). You may not modify, rent, lease, loan, sell, distribute or create derivative works based on these data, content, or resources (either in whole or in part) unless you have been specifically given permission to do so by the relevant owners. 7.3 You acknowledge that your use of such third party applications, data, content, or resources may be subject to separate terms between you and the relevant third party. In that case, the License Agreement does not affect your legal relationship with these third parties.

8. Using Android APIs

8.1 Google Data APIs 8.1.1 If you use any API to retrieve data from Google, you acknowledge that the data may be protected by intellectual property rights which are owned by Google or those parties that provide the data (or by other persons or companies on their behalf). Your use of any such API may be subject to additional Terms of Service. You may not modify, rent, lease, loan, sell, distribute or create derivative works based on this data (either in whole or in part) unless allowed by the relevant Terms of Service. 8.1.2 If you use any API to retrieve a user's data from Google, you acknowledge and agree that you shall retrieve data only with the user's explicit consent and only when, and for the limited purposes for which, the user has given you permission to do so.

9. Terminating this License Agreement

9.1 The License Agreement will continue to apply until terminated by either you or Google as set out below. 9.2 If you want to terminate the License Agreement, you may do so by ceasing your use of the SDK and any relevant developer credentials. 9.3 Google may at any time, terminate the License Agreement with you if: (A) you have breached any provision of the License Agreement; or (B) Google is required to do so by law; or (C) the partner with whom Google offered certain parts of SDK (such as APIs) to you has terminated its relationship with Google or ceased to offer certain parts of the SDK to you; or (D) Google decides to no longer provide the SDK or certain parts of the SDK to users in the country in which you are resident or from which you use the service, or the provision of the SDK or certain SDK services to you by Google is, in Google's sole discretion, no longer commercially viable. 9.4 When the License Agreement comes to an end, all of the legal rights, obligations and liabilities that you and Google have benefited from, been subject to (or which have accrued over time whilst the License Agreement has been in force) or which are expressed to continue indefinitely, shall be unaffected by this cessation, and the provisions of paragraph 14.7 shall continue to apply to such rights, obligations and liabilities indefinitely.

10. DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES

10.1 YOU EXPRESSLY UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT YOUR USE OF THE SDK IS AT YOUR SOLE RISK AND THAT THE SDK IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND "AS AVAILABLE" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND FROM GOOGLE. 10.2 YOUR USE OF THE SDK AND ANY MATERIAL DOWNLOADED OR OTHERWISE OBTAINED THROUGH THE USE OF THE SDK IS AT YOUR OWN DISCRETION AND RISK AND YOU ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE TO YOUR COMPUTER SYSTEM OR OTHER DEVICE OR LOSS OF DATA THAT RESULTS FROM SUCH USE. 10.3 GOOGLE FURTHER EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT.

11. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

11.1 YOU EXPRESSLY UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT GOOGLE, ITS SUBSIDIARIES AND AFFILIATES, AND ITS LICENSORS SHALL NOT BE LIABLE TO YOU UNDER ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES THAT MAY BE INCURRED BY YOU, INCLUDING ANY LOSS OF DATA, WHETHER OR NOT GOOGLE OR ITS REPRESENTATIVES HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF OR SHOULD HAVE BEEN AWARE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF ANY SUCH LOSSES ARISING.

12. Indemnification

12.1 To the maximum extent permitted by law, you agree to defend, indemnify and hold harmless Google, its affiliates and their respective directors, officers, employees and agents from and against any and all claims, actions, suits or proceedings, as well as any and all losses, liabilities, damages, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys fees) arising out of or accruing from (a) your use of the SDK, (b) any application you develop on the SDK that infringes any copyright, trademark, trade secret, trade dress, patent or other intellectual property right of any person or defames any person or violates their rights of publicity or privacy, and (c) any non-compliance by you with the License Agreement.

13. Changes to the License Agreement

13.1 Google may make changes to the License Agreement as it distributes new versions of the SDK. When these changes are made, Google will make a new version of the License Agreement available on the website where the SDK is made available.

14. General Legal Terms

14.1 The License Agreement constitutes the whole legal agreement between you and Google and governs your use of the SDK (excluding any services which Google may provide to you under a separate written agreement), and completely replaces any prior agreements between you and Google in relation to the SDK. 14.2 You agree that if Google does not exercise or enforce any legal right or remedy which is contained in the License Agreement (or which Google has the benefit of under any applicable law), this will not be taken to be a formal waiver of Google's rights and that those rights or remedies will still be available to Google. 14.3 If any court of law, having the jurisdiction to decide on this matter, rules that any provision of the License Agreement is invalid, then that provision will be removed from the License Agreement without affecting the rest of the License Agreement. The remaining provisions of the License Agreement will continue to be valid and enforceable. 14.4 You acknowledge and agree that each member of the group of companies of which Google is the parent shall be third party beneficiaries to the License Agreement and that such other companies shall be entitled to directly enforce, and rely upon, any provision of the License Agreement that confers a benefit on (or rights in favor of) them. Other than this, no other person or company shall be third party beneficiaries to the License Agreement. 14.5 EXPORT RESTRICTIONS. THE SDK IS SUBJECT TO UNITED STATES EXPORT LAWS AND REGULATIONS. YOU MUST COMPLY WITH ALL DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL EXPORT LAWS AND REGULATIONS THAT APPLY TO THE SDK. THESE LAWS INCLUDE RESTRICTIONS ON DESTINATIONS, END USERS AND END USE. 14.6 The rights granted in the License Agreement may not be assigned or transferred by either you or Google without the prior written approval of the other party. Neither you nor Google shall be permitted to delegate their responsibilities or obligations under the License Agreement without the prior written approval of the other party. 14.7 The License Agreement, and your relationship with Google under the License Agreement, shall be governed by the laws of the State of California without regard to its conflict of laws provisions. You and Google agree to submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts located within the county of Santa Clara, California to resolve any legal matter arising from the License Agreement. Notwithstanding this, you agree that Google shall still be allowed to apply for injunctive remedies (or an equivalent type of urgent legal relief) in any jurisdiction. December 9, 2016

developer.android.com


Смотрите также