Gamemaker studio


GameMaker Studio - Wikipedia

GameMaker Studio (formerly Animo until 1999, Game Maker until 2011, GameMaker until 2012, and GameMaker: Studio until 2017) is a proprietary game creation system created by Mark Overmars in the Delphi programming language.[1]

GameMaker accommodates the creation of cross-platform and multi-genre video games using drag and drop action sequences or a sandboxed scripting language known as Game Maker Language, which can be used to develop more advanced games that could not be created just by using the drag and drop features. GameMaker was designed to allow novice computer programmers to be able to make computer games without much programming knowledge by use of these actions.

History

Originally titled Animo, the program was first released in 1999,[2] and began as a program for creating 2D animations. The name was later changed to GameMaker, lacking a space to avoid intellectual property conflicts with the 1991 software Game-Maker.[3]

Design

GameMaker primarily runs games that use 2D graphics, allowing the use of limited 3D graphics.[4]

GameMaker is designed to allow its users to easily develop video games without having to learn a complex programming language such as C++ or Java through its proprietary drag and drop system.[5][6] These icons represent actions that would occur in a game, such as movement, basic drawing, and simple control structures. It is also possible to create custom "action libraries" using the Library Maker. Game Maker Language (GML) is the primary interpreted scripting language used in GameMaker, which is usually significantly slower than compiled languages such as C++ or Delphi.[7]

GameMaker accommodates redistribution on multiple platforms.[8] The program builds for these platforms: Microsoft Windows, macOS, Ubuntu, HTML5, Android, iOS, Windows Phone, Tizen, Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita.[9][10] However, a Windows desktop computer with system requirements equal to that of the game produced is required in order to develop the games along with a broadband internet connection.[11]

Reverse engineering

Several versions of the software made reverse engineering easy by packing resource data to the end of the executable with no encryption or internal obfuscation.[12] A decompiler was released specifically for decompiling games distributed with the early iOS runner.[13] Obfuscation programs were later developed and released to deter hackers from extracting the game resources from executable files built with the program.[14] The latest version of the software, GM: Studio, makes it harder to decompile games given its compiled nature and it has built in obfuscation.[15]

Digital rights management

Screenshot showing the DRM image

In late 2012 and early 2013, YoYo Games released a version of their new Studio IDE for cross-platform development that would import games and destroy all of the image type resources for some legitimate purchasers of the software by superimposing a pirate symbol on top of the image.[16] This was due to a fault in their digital rights management software implementation which they use as a method of combating infringing copies of the software.[17][18] YoYoGames publicly stated they would remove the DRM at a later point in time, but that other less-invasive DRM techniques would remain.[19]

Reception

The program currently holds a rating of 8.4/10 on Mod DB based on 196 user reviews; many cite its flexibility and ease of use as positives and instability, crashes, project corruption and outdated features as negatives.[20] Douglas Clements of Indie Game Magazine wrote that the program "[s]implifies and streamlines game development" and is "easy for beginners yet powerful enough to grow as you develop", though noting that "resource objects have to be gathered if unable to create" and that licensing between Steam and the YoYo Games website is "convoluted".[21]

References

External links

en.wikipedia.org

GameMaker Studio Release Notes | YoYo Games

GameMaker Studio 2

This version of GameMaker Studio 2 is mainly a bug-fix release. See below for some of the fixes.

Release notes

Welcome the brand new version of GameMaker Studio 2 - v2.1! This version is a major release of GMS2 and includes the first full version of the Mac IDE, along with several new components.

Release notes

Welcome the brand new version of GameMaker Studio 2 - v2.1! This version is a major release of GMS2 and includes the first full version of the Mac IDE, along with several new components.

Release notes

Welcome the brand new version of GameMaker Studio 2 - v2.1! This version is a major release of GMS2 and includes the first full version of the Mac IDE, along with several new components.

Release notes

Several new IDE features: the start page has been rewritten to fix general performance and white screen issues; the start of the remote worker system; image editor Blur and Reverse Frames tools; and a new proxy server interface to provide authentication details. Another stack of in-game bug fixes, and we have now implemented lots of functions which previously did not exist in HTML5.

Release notes

This is mainly a bug-fix release, with lots and lots of issues resolved across the entire product. However, we have also added Pinch and Rotate gesture events and the first few image editor tools: Trim, Reverse Frames, and Colour Remove.

The Mac IDE also now has an automated Mono download and install stage if Mono is not detected on your Mac. This is also the first parity version between Windows and Closed Beta Mac, so IDE feature-wise (not the targets) they should now be on par - if not, we'd like to know.

Please note there is a licensing fix in this version, and accordingly this release had to be made mandatory.

Release notes

This is mainly a bug-fix release, with lots and lots of issues resolved across the entire product. However, we have also added Pinch and Rotate gesture events and the first few image editor tools: Trim, Reverse Frames, and Colour Remove.

The Mac IDE also now has an automated Mono download and install stage if Mono is not detected on your Mac. This is also the first parity version between Windows and Closed Beta Mac, so IDE feature-wise (not the targets) they should now be on par - if not, we'd like to know.

Please note there is a licensing fix in this version, and accordingly this release had to be made mandatory.

Release notes

This is mainly an IDE and exports stability release, fixing a number of the issues we've had reported.

However, we have also added new Gesture events to allow simple detection of taps, double-taps, drags and flicks, which vastly simplifies interaction on touch-screen devices. On desktop devices, the mouse will also act as the first finger, allowing you to test single-touch events.

There is also a new layer compositing system in the Image Editor, which allows for more accurate compositing and better layer effects in the future.

Release notes

This is mainly an IDE and exports stability release, fixing a number of the issues we've had reported.

However, we have also added new Gesture events to allow simple detection of taps, double-taps, drags and flicks, which vastly simplifies interaction on touch-screen devices. On desktop devices, the mouse will also act as the first finger, allowing you to test single-touch events.

There is also a new layer compositing system in the Image Editor, which allows for more accurate compositing and better layer effects in the future.

Release notes

This is mainly an IDE and exports stability release, fixing a number of the issues we've had reported.

However, we have also added new Gesture events to allow simple detection of taps, double-taps, drags and flicks, which vastly simplifies interaction on touch-screen devices. On desktop devices, the mouse will also act as the first finger, allowing you to test single-touch events.

There is also a new layer compositing system in the Image Editor, which allows for more accurate compositing and better layer effects in the future.

Release notes

This is mainly an IDE and exports stability release, fixing a number of the issues we've had reported.

However, we have also added new Gesture events to allow simple detection of taps, double-taps, drags and flicks, which vastly simplifies interaction on touch-screen devices. On desktop devices, the mouse will also act as the first finger, allowing you to test single-touch events.

There is also a new layer compositing system in the Image Editor, which allows for more accurate compositing and better layer effects in the future.

Release notes

This version opens up the iOS, Android, HTML5 and Windows UWP targets - which you can now purchase via your YoYo Account panel as the Mobile, Web and UWP products. While we have tested them heavily internally, there will inevitably be some lingering issues, so please report any you find. UWP supports desktop, mobile and XBox One, making it a very wide-ranging set of devices you can now target.

Git source control is now finally available, but please use with care in these inital weeks of release, as there may be some unexpected issues that crop up.

There is also a new PNG-to-tilemap tool built into the room editor. This will take images and generate tiles from them, recognising both normal tiles and mirrored, flipped and rotated versions. Not only does this allow you to import old maps, but it's also a great way of compressing a very large image, as it will remove both duplicates and spaces.

Release notes

This version opens up the iOS, Android, HTML5 and Windows UWP targets - which you can now purchase via your YoYo Account panel as the Mobile, Web and UWP products. While we have tested them heavily internally, there will inevitably be some lingering issues, so please report any you find. UWP supports desktop, mobile and XBox One, making it a very wide-ranging set of devices you can now target.

Git source control is now finally available, but please use with care in these inital weeks of release, as there may be some unexpected issues that crop up.

There is also a new PNG-to-tilemap tool built into the room editor. This will take images and generate tiles from them, recognising both normal tiles and mirrored, flipped and rotated versions. Not only does this allow you to import old maps, but it's also a great way of compressing a very large image, as it will remove both duplicates and spaces.

Release notes

There are lots of new features in this version (see below), along with many bug fixes. Extensions are now in and active, although we do expect some issues to arise as you use them for the first time - please bear with us as we address these. You can also now upload GMS2 assets to the Marketplace (you can also upload a GMS2 package alongside your existing GM:S assets, so you don't have to make duplicate assets). We now have an amazingly cool "LIVE PREVIEW" mode in DnD™ which lets you see the equivalent GML code as you build up your DnD™ script. There is a new Ball Breaker demo for both GML and DnD.

Release notes

This is the first update to the Beta of GameMaker Studio 2

There have been lots of general fixes in this version and a couple of UI items we've had feedback on have been implemented. We will continue to monitor the various forums and social media channels for suggestions, and add them to our backlog if we can do them.

Here are some useful links to help get you started:

Release notes

Welcome to the brand new Beta of GameMaker Studio 2!

This is a ground up rewrite of the IDE, but also includes many new runtime changes and features. We highly recommend that you at least browse the new manual, watch the videos, and even try doing some of the new tutorials, as this will help you get to grips with the new editor and workflow.There will no doubt be some issues that we will need to address early on, but we're also very interested in user feedback, as to how you find the new IDE, and any improvements you'd like to see. You are also encouraged to take part in discussions on the GameMaker Community (GMC) forums, and to get in touch with us through social media or the helpdesk if you're having any issues.

Here are some useful links to get you started:

UPDATE: Surveys have been disabled for the time being.

Release notes

Welcome to the brand new Beta of GameMaker Studio 2!

This is a ground up rewrite of the IDE, but also includes many new runtime changes and features. We highly recommend that you at least browse the new manual, watch the videos, and even try doing some of the new tutorials, as this will help you get to grips with the new editor and workflow.There will no doubt be some issues that we will need to address early on, but we're also very interested in user feedback, as to how you find the new IDE, and any improvements you'd like to see. You are also encouraged to take part in discussions on the GameMaker Community (GMC) forums, and to get in touch with us through social media or the helpdesk if you're having any issues.

Here are some useful links to get you started:

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

Marketplace and tutorials have changed a lot in this version, and there are some new power saving settings for laptop users. Aside from this, hundreds of other bugs have been addressed - please let us know if you find any issues.

Release notes

www.yoyogames.com

GameMaker Studio 2 Manual

Welcome to the GameMaker Studio 2 user manual! This document is divided into three parts with the aim of getting you introduced to the interface and basic workings of GameMaker Studio 2 before going on to more advanced usage and the functions available through our propriety scripting language GML or our visual scripting tool Drag and Drop. To ease you into things we have created a handy Quick Start Guide, and even if you are familiar with other game creation tools we recommend that you start there to get an overview of the way that GameMaker Studio 2 works. You'll find GameMaker Studio 2 to be easy and intuitive to use and that, whatever your skill level, you will soon be making those games you've always dreamed of.

NOTE: Due to the modular nature of GameMaker Studio 2 there are certain things that are not included in this user manual, particularly those aspects of setting up and connecting the different devices that can be supported. For up-to-date information and troubleshooting hints and tips related to the different target platforms, please see the YoYo Games Help Center.

Getting Started

This section is the obligatory first stop for using GameMaker Studio 2 and getting to grips with how things work. You'll find that GameMaker Studio 2 is intuitive and simple to use, and even if you've never used any tools like this before you shouldn't have any problems getting started and making games after reading through this section. Once you've got to grips with the basics you can then move on to the more in-depth look at the components of GameMaker Studio 2 in the Interface section below.

Setting Up Quick Start Guide Additional Information

Interface

The GameMaker Studio 2 IDE (integrated development environment) has a number of advanced options that are of great importance if you wish to get the most out of the product. These options include source control integration, project configurations, advanced debugging and a number of extra tools for changing and manipulating the game assets (please note that the availability of some of these advanced tools will depend on the version of GameMaker Studio 2 that you currently use).

Editors Extras Settings

Scripting

This section deals with the different scripting languages available to you for programming in GameMaker Studio 2. The language or method that you use to create your projects will depend on your skill and your previous background history, and since everyone is different GameMaker Studio 2 aims to be as adaptable as possible to your different needs, offering two different options for you to create games:

Drag and Drop (DnD™) Drag and Drop (DnD™) is ideal for beginners or those that are more visually or artistically orientated (this is sometimes called a "visual scripting language"). It consists of dragging and dropping actions into the Object Editor to create a list of functions that instances of the object will follow. You can find out how to use DnD™ from the following sections of the manual:
  1. Drag And Drop Overview
  2. Drag And Drop Reference
GameMaker Language (GML) Here you can get an overview of the GameMaker Language syntax along with examples of use and program structure, and you can also find a complete reference guide for all the built-in GML functions. If you are new to using a scripting language then it is recommended that you start with the GML Overview, otherwise just use the reference guide to check up on function names when required:
  1. GML Overview
  2. GML Reference

Note that these are not mutually exclusive ways to make your games, and you can mix using GML with DnD™ as you wish, depending on your skill and requirements with either.

docs2.yoyogames.com

GameMaker: Studio Manual

GameMaker: Studio Manual

Version 1.4by YoYo Games Ltd.

Welcome to the GameMaker: Studio user manual! This document is divided into three parts with the aim of getting you introduced to the interface and basic workings of GameMaker: Studio before going on to more advanced usage and the functions available through GML (the GameMaker Language). New users should definitely start at the beginning with the Using GameMaker: Studio section as it has all the information you need to get started as quickly as possible, however users of previous GameMaker versions can probably skip to the Advanced Use section to see what's new in this version. Whatever your skill level, we hope that this manual helps you to realise the true power within GameMaker: Studio and make your gaming dreams become reality!

NOTE: Due to the modular nature of GameMaker: Studio there are certain things that are not included in the manual, particularly those aspects of setting up and connecting the different devices that can be supported. For up-to-date information and troubleshooting hints and tips, please see the YoYo Games Knowledge Base.

Using GameMaker: Studio

This section describes the basic use of GameMaker: Studio, explaining the idea behind the program and describing how to add sprites, backgrounds and sounds. It also covers how to define objects with events and actions, and how to add them into the rooms that you design. Please note that the availability of certain tools and the number of certain resources that you can create may be restricted depending on the version of GameMaker: Studio that you use (more information can be found here).

The following sections exist to help get you started:

  1. Introduction
  2. Installation
  3. Activation
  4. GameMaker: Studio Overview
  5. The Graphical User Interface
  6. Loading Sprites
  7. Sounds And Music
  8. Backgrounds
  9. Defining Objects
  10. Events
  11. Actions
  12. Creating Rooms
  13. Distributing Your Game

Advanced Use

The GameMaker: Studio IDE (integrated development environment) has a number of advanced options that are of great importance if you wish to get the most out of the product. These options include source control integration, project configurations, advanced debugging and a number of extra tools for changing and manipulating the game assets (please note that the availability of some of these advanced tools will depend on the version of GameMaker: Studio that you currently use). This section of the manual is split into the following three parts, each with its own subsection dealing with one particular aspect of the IDE:

Game Assets
  1. More About Sprites
  2. More About Backgrounds
  3. More About Objects
  4. More About Rooms
  5. More About Async Events
Resource Editors
  1. Fonts
  2. Paths
  3. Time Lines
  4. Scripts
  5. Shaders
  6. Constants
  7. Including Files
  8. Importing Resources
Game Settings
  1. Extension Packages
  2. Configurations
  3. Source Control
  4. Global Game Settings
  5. GameMaker: Studio Preferences
  6. Debugging
  7. The Marketplace
  8. The GameMaker: Player

Reference

Here you can find references for many of the GameMaker: Studio features, as well as a rundown of all of the functions, variables and constants that make up the built-in programming language. This language gives you much more flexibility and control over your games than the standard actions and we will refer to it as GML (the GameMaker Language). You can find descriptions of all the functions available in GML as well as an overview of how they can be used along with examples of code using them. We also cover the constants and variables that GML has available to control all aspects of your game.

This section contains an overview of the GameMaker Language, with the rules for structure and syntax, as well as examples of how to use expressions and different operations:

  1. GML Overview

The following sections all detail the many different functions that are available to you when using GML. They have been split into different groups of associated functions and, where necessary, have been cross-referenced with related functions and sections.

Real Numbers And Strings
  1. Date and Time
  2. Maths
  3. Strings
Game Play
  1. Game Assets
  2. Mouse, Keyboard and Other Controls
  3. Movement and Collisions
  4. Objects and Instances
Drawing And Display
  1. Drawing
  2. Shaders
  3. Surfaces
  4. The Display, Windows And Views
Advanced Functions
  1. Data Structures
  2. Particles
  3. Physics
  4. File Handling
  5. Operating System
  6. Buffers
  7. Networking
Platform Specific
  1. HTML5
  2. Windows 8
  3. Social Gaming
  4. In App Purchases
  5. Push Notifications
  6. Asynchronous
  7. Cloud Services
  8. Steam API
Extras
  1. Debugging
  2. Miscellaneous
  3. Obsolete Functions
© Copyright YoYo Games Ltd. 2015 All Rights Reserved

docs.yoyogames.com


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